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History Of Prohibition
  • MODERATION WAS THE NORM
  • SOCIAL CONTROLS WERE STRONG
  • CHANGE AND REVOLUTION CREATED PROBLEMS
  • BIRTH OF THE TEMPERANCE MOVEMENT
  • FROM TEMPERANCE TO TOTAL ABSTINENCE
  • PAVING THE ROAD TO UTOPIA
  • ESTABLISHMENT OF ALCOHOL EDUCATION
  • TEMPERANCE TEACHINGS
  • SCIENTIFIC TEMPERANCE INSTRUCTION CRITICIZED
  • THE LEGACY
  • THE NOBLE EXPERIMENT
  • PROHIBITION AND THE KKK
  • ANOTHER TRY FOR PROHIBITION
  • TEMPERANCE MOVEMENT BIDES ITS TIME
  • THE NEW TEMPERANCE MOVEMENT
  • SUMMARY
  • Appendix
  • History Of Prohibition

    THE NOBLE EXPERIMENT

    Mary Hunt (1897, p. 63) had expressed concern over "the enormous increase of immigrant population flooding us from the old world, men and women who have brought to our shores and into our politics old world habits and ideas [favorable to alcohol]" and peppered her writing with references to this "undesirable immigration" and "these immigrant hordes." She is but one example. The largely anti-foreign, anti-Catholic, anti-Black, anti-German, anti-Semitic, and anti-urban nature of the temperance movement has been extensively documented (Kobler, 1973, pp. 168-169; Odegard, 1928, pp. 24-35; Sinclair, 1962, ch. 2 and pp. 119-126; Stivers, 1983, p. 358; Hofstadter, 1965, pp. 289-290). It appears to be no coincidence that legislation restricting immigration occurred during the height of the temperance movement's power.







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